Michael Allison

Email: mikeyallisonart@gmail.com
Website: https://www.etsy.com/shop/MJArtsShop

I like to fly blind and see if I can bring what’s inside my head onto the canvass. I work with acrylic paints because they suite the needs of my style – something that dries fast, can be applied in layers, and is economical when I get ambitions to work large (which I often do).
I say “fly blind” because the painting process I stumbled into over the years involves a masking of each layer of paint after application. Working light to dark, I apply a single coat of paint with a roller and then block off portions of the canvas with an adhesive (typically tape or glue) where I don’t want the next layer of paint to appear. This process is repeated until the canvass is essentially entirely covered in adhesive hiding a painting underneath. Then I take a deep breath, remove the adhesive, and hope the painting that’s revealed underneath looks like what I imagined in my head.
I won’t lie, sometimes the painting matches what I had planned, and sometimes it does not. However, I’ve never been displeased with the end result (yet?). I think that’s what I enjoy most about the process – the hours and hours of labor always end with a bit of a surprise at the end. I usually add a little brushwork to the piece at the end to give it some pop.
Portraits are my burgeoning passion. If you enjoy my style and would like to commission a portrait of a particular person (or animal) I can be contacted at mikeyallisonart@gmail.com.

 

Aimee Beyette

Email:  aimeebeyette@gmail.com
Website:  www.beyettepetportraits.com

Aimee was born and raised near Buffalo, NY, moving to Northern Virginia in 2015 to escape the Lake Erie snow.  She has forever been dabbling in various art forms to become versatile in many media to suit her current role as a Therapeutic Art Program Manager for adults with disabilities.  She completed her BA in Studio Art from William Smith College in Geneva, NY and her MS in Art Therapy from Nazareth College in Rochester, NY.

Specializing in charcoal, her drawing style is representational to capture a moment in time.  She enjoys drawing animals, people, and nature scenes.  Aimee also enjoys using acrylics to feed her soul through abstract expression and mandala creation.

Available for commission work.

 

Ann Bolster

Email: annbolster@yahoo.com

Ann Bolster works in oils, oils and foil, acrylics, collage and mixed media. She paints landscapes, street scenes, still lifes and animals, particularly cats, wolves and foxes. While her style in oils is representational, her style in acrylics, collage and mixed media tends toward the abstract. Whichever style that she is exploring, she loves dramatic color contrasts, particularly the rich natural colors of old textiles oriental carpets and medieval paintings. Her extensive travels often influence the subject matter of her art.

Marsha Brown

I paint with watercolor and often include ink for definition.  Thus many of my paintings have a lot of drawing in the image.

My expression is often whimsical, using line and color in a loose and free manner. People, animals and nature are what I paint most.

I grew up outside Detroit, Michigan.   I have always liked art even in high school; making art; visiting museums and galleries; or just reading about it.   Currently I have a studio in Alexandria, Virginia.  I show my work mostly in the Virginia:  Gallery Underground, The Art League and other venues such as libraries, retail outlets, professional offices, corporate offices and more.

 

Jody Clarke

Email: jodyclarke.wh@gmail.com

I have always liked to draw and create. Since my childhood on a small farm in rural Maryland, I have felt an affinity for plants and animals and am continually fascinated by the beautiful lines, shapes and colors of the natural world.

As an adult working and raising a family in Arlington, I would occasionally draw or paint. When my youngest child moved away, hit by a wave of creative energy, I began to pick up every interesting branch, seed pod and vine I came across in the woods and parks. I would augment these with beads, buttons, and ribbons to create hanging sculptures and sun catchers that showcased the innate elegance of the natural structure. Over time, I began using small pieces of metal, glass and plastic (all gleaned from the curbs of Arlington) in these works as well.

Currently, I am creating collages using torn paper mostly repurposed from magazines. For subjects I use photos taken of trees, fungi, fallen leaves and whatever else catches my eye as I walk. As with the hanging art, these collages celebrate the aesthetic of the natural world, which is my ongoing inspiration.